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The Change in the Hotel Industry

There’s been a change in the world, and the shift is quite radical. International travelers are currently spending more and expecting more at the same time. They are prepared to spend big money when deciding where to go on their next vacation.

In this article, we will take a look at the latest trends happening in the luxury travel area and why catering to the traveler is essential for hoteliers. Modern travelers are eager to invest that bit extra to create their escape that much more unique and luxurious. Accommodations in Australia are growing to adapt to this new trends.

British households spend an average of 2 weeks’ salary in their summer vacation while Australians hand over a mean of $3,962 on each overseas excursion, using a suggested prospective increase of 9 percent. If people are ready to commit so much on their holiday, it is safe to say that they wish to experience something extraordinary.

Expectations are on the upswing.

Online booking websites which cater especially to the more complex traveler are visiting great successes. In the Asia Pacific, the planet’s fastest growing travel area, a new type of celebrities dubbed ‘Travel Celebrities’ has emerged. These celebrities’ social media accounts create massive influence on people’s perception of how their next traveling experience should be.

Take Tasmania as an example. Amongst the many places of interest is Tasmania, where its cultural heritage and exquisite natural environment blends in together to create one of the most wonderful places to visit in the world. Hotels in Hobart, the capital city of this smallest state in Australia, make full use of the resources that this coastal town has to offer. The Henry Jones Art Hotel, for example, is located within a stretch of historical buildings. Guided tours of how the place comes to be are offered for today’s tourists who thirst for meaning. With Tasmania’s growth rate in tourism being higher than Australia’s national average, a large number of satisfactory rate was reported by people visiting Hobart in regards to their accommodations. Hotels like The Henry Jones had done something right.

Today’s guests are not happy with just a complimentary chocolate in their own pillow. Four or five stars aren’t as important as they once were unless it is possible to back them up with excellent reviews, exceptional conveniences, and high tech facilities. In an era of the millennials, where internet booking and meta-search engines are an essential component of traveling preparation, travelers are somewhat more complicated and educated than ever. 2014 research shows that 148.3 million journey reservations are made online every year, with net travel booking earnings growing by over 73% over the previous five decades.

Travelers will always try to find the best bargains

Travelers now compare prices, services, facilities and testimonials in order to find just what they want and desire. Based on TripAdvisor, 89 percent of travelers say that testimonials are powerful, and Internet in Traveling has found that 53 percent of users will discount a property if testimonials are inaccessible. Not only are travelers more educated, they’ve assumed a level of standard when it concerns the operation of an accommodation. As a hotelier, so as to maintain your premises before the game it’s essential you know about the latest industry trends.

Luxurious is described as ‘a condition of fantastic relaxation mixed with sophistication, particularly if it involves great expense’, therefore it’s your job to make this experience to your visitors. To be able to reach this, it is important to keep in mind that personalized and tailored encounters are crucial. Guests want to feel as though they are stepping in their second home, with their personal preferences and unique requirements catered to them constantly. As a good hotelier, you must be able to provide this as a base, before adding few more touches like what accommodations in Tasmania has done.

Meanwhile, take a look at how Millenials are changing the hotel industry: